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Thread: Lifted My 98 Legacy

  1. #1
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    Default Lifted My 98 Legacy

    I get a lot of questions about my suspension lift so I wanted to post my build.

    King Springs KSFR-26 KSRR-25 http://www.kingsprings.com/
    KYB GR-2 RF-235632 LF-235633 RR-335020 LR-335021


    First: the Outback struts

    I started with just the struts for Outback and SUS and that gave me about 1.5" of lift. It was nice but I fully intended to get taller springs eventually. The saggy butt is from all the stereo in the trunk, I think it would be level otherwise.



    Then: King springs

    It took me a while to find the right springs and I am really happy with King Springs. They may cost a lot to ship but I couldn't find anything like them in the USA. They are the perfect amount of stiffness and I got a few inches more lift.

    Last edited by i5racer; 07-09-2012 at 07:04 AM.

  2. #2
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    What's the ride like compared to stock?
    Does it feel stiffer? Mushier?

    Good job!

  3. #3
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    Do you know what the rate of the springs are? And did you do anything with the swaybars?
    Alloy control arms?
    92 legacy (t)wagon
    "If you know you can do something, I don't think it takes a lot of courage to do it." -Roger Clark

  4. #4
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    Definately a lot stiffer but the GR-2 struts alone made a huge difference there.

    Don't know the rate on the springs, they're streetable but driving Seattle streets is kinda like driving off-road.

    Alloy endlinks replaced my craptastic stock plastic "endlinks" and the aluminum control arms I picked up after folding a stock one in half.

    Fourth: Rear stabilizer bar and mounts

    The Outback rear sway bar is 18mm so I picked that up also. The mounts are taller on Outback and SUS but unfortunately they aren't any stronger.





    Don't Forget: Exhaust shield bolts

    I haven't seen these mentioned before, I don't know if they are a big deal but I got them so there wouldn't be any issues.


    To complete the lift I'm getting a set of trailing arm mounts from an Outback to correct the massive rear caster and center the rear wheels. The Outback crossmember spacers are also on the list to reduce stress on the drivetrain.
    Last edited by i5racer; 07-14-2010 at 08:19 AM.

  5. #5
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    Now the problem I'm most concerned about: centering the rear wheel. You can see in these pics that it is causing the angles of the lateral links to be off also.




    Sixth: Trailing arm brackets

    The Outback bracket is a little taller and reduces the insane caster from lifting the struts. I lost the side by side pics but here's the installed Outback bracket. There's about 1-1/2" between the end of the arm and the bracket mount now.


    Seventh: Rear subframe spacers

    To complete the rear lift and take some stress off the driveline, the subframe is spaced off the frame about an inch. Get the bolts with the spacers for the entire car as the originals will be too short.



    Eighth: Differential subframe spacers and brackets

    The rear subframe is also spaced at the forward end right behind the trailing arm brackets. I did both at the same time and it was a little easier to get at the bolts that way. Taking off a stubborn bolt and breaking the welded nut off inside the frame sucks. (See second pic below)



    Now the rear wheel should be almost centered in the wheel well.


    Ninth: Front subframe spacers

    Just like the rear, it's a good idea to do one side at a time and take out the steering column knuckle before doing the driver's side.



    Tenth: Transmission crossmember

    I thought they were just spacers, they are but they're welded to the crossmember so just get the whole thing and the bolts.

    Last edited by i5racer; 07-27-2010 at 06:44 AM.

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    Tenth: Continued from above

    The rearward piece is also differently shaped, flatter to hang the transmission lower in the rear also. The center joining piece actually remains common to both models.



    Eleventh: Steering knuckle

    After spacing the front crossmember the larger gap between the column and the rack will be too big for your old knuckle. I found it easiest to remove the two bolts under the ignition key and have a friend hold the wheel while I lined up the splines then just push it back in and bolt it back up.


    12th: Transverse Links

    Even though I had the Whiteline PSRS, lowering the front crossmember was too much for them to handle. They are lower than GT stock but nothing like the Outback mounts. If you want a cheap PSRS see how the Outback mounts fit and report back to me.



    13th: Exhaust shield bracket

    The rear of the muffler shield mounts to the subframe so the fracket in front has to be angled more and a little bit longer. I tried to reshape the original but it wouldn't work and without the Outback bracket it would rub on the crossmember.



    14th Outback muffler

    The pipe is bent differently for outback, sedans and wagons use the same part number. If you use the GT sedan muffler 3 out of 4 exhaust hangers are too high and need brackets from the Outback to lower them. I used some copper wire to rig it and relied heavily on the one mounted to the subframe. The muffler hung much lower than before but it was the only way to clear the subframe. A muffler from a Legacy S/W will fit slightly better and allows you to hang it with the stock hangers near the tip. The problem is that the pipe hanger that goes to the subframe is way too close and will rattle unless you bind the mounts.

    15th Outback driveshaft

    The center bushing is too high and needs to be spaced out or replaced with the Outback part. I put a few washers on longer bolts just until it was clear of the differential crossmember.


    16th Engine pitch stop mount

    Since the engine sits lower in the engine bay the pitch stop needs to be longer, I believe the bracket on the transmission is different also but I don't remember. The outback part is stiffer and metal so it could actually be an upgrade also.
    Last edited by i5racer; 07-09-2012 at 07:09 AM.

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    Registered Member dirtslayer's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^that is BA for sure.. props to the amount of work and head scratching done for everyone. thats legit

  8. #8
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    In which PAP did you find a Outback?! The one in Tacoma never has anything that new.
    92 legacy (t)wagon
    "If you know you can do something, I don't think it takes a lot of courage to do it." -Roger Clark

  9. #9
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    In Lynnwood, everyone I've talked to that has been to the Tacoma yard says it sucks. I made so many trips up to the yard, sometimes more than twice in a day and nobody had touched my donor car. Can't beat Pull-
    a-Part prices either. I hope this guide saves some people the extra trips that I made to get all these pieces
    Last edited by i5racer; 10-06-2010 at 07:16 AM.

  10. #10
    Registered Member GreenMtnMan's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the detail and pics. Excellent! Where are the finished pics?
    Don't retreat, reload
    N2DDC

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    I'm pretty sure the only things I left out were the Outback center driveshaft bushing and there are brackets to hang the muffler a little lower with the same rubber hangers. Longer bolts and spacers fixed problem #1 and the muffler is hung with copper wire at the moment, really ghetto but it's worked so far.



    Here's the most recent pic, I need new CV's because the boots got all gracked to hell from sitting and now the grease is all over. They went pretty long like that I'm guessing before I noticed and even longer before I noticed clicking. I need spanks for not rebooting them on install and double spanks for not doing it before they started with the chatter. I'm searching for rebuilt OEM axles now to replace the ones I neglected

  12. #12

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    thats a wild car, i have 98 legacy sedan that i want to lift, so all you did was get the outback struts to lift it 1.5", no need for the springs?

  13. #13

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    Incredible post. Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by edyer21 View Post
    thats a wild car, i have 98 legacy sedan that i want to lift, so all you did was get the outback struts to lift it 1.5", no need for the springs?
    Outback struts are lifted at the base which allows for larger tires, I liked it at that height a lot but I have a demon that makes me push everything further

  15. #15
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    I added to the DIY and edited some incorrect info. There are a few little parts that I forgot about added now

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